Lines of Continuity

What if the same line that describes this cheek...


...also described this shoulder blade?


What if this breast didn't end here...


...but here?


What if this...


...connected to this?


We might refer to such imaginary connections between unrelated body parts as "lines of continuity."



These lines help us in our observational work, to maintain proportion and achieve unity. Where one thing leaves off, another may pick up along the same, or similar, path.


Lines of continuity will vary depending on viewing angle and personal interpretation.


They can be used on a micro level, to link parts which are nearby...


...or on a macro level, between figures.


What lines of continuity can you find in this image?


Don't draw parts in isolation.  Relate them to other parts.  Find lines of continuity!


Babe Lab Disclaimer : Non-proprietary photos and illustrations featured on Babe Lab appear for the sole purpose of review.

2 Figure Composition Randomizer

The following tutorial incorporates three previous Babe Lab tutorials.

- More or Less?
- The Canopy Effect
Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To

 

In 2 figure compositions, one figure is seen more (dominant), the other less.  Abstract compositions built from angular "canopies" divide space, creating limitations which aid in design.  By altering the camera angle, there is no end to what you can get from one abstract!

This method works well as an idea generator.  Not all experiments will be successful, but there will be many unexpected results which can be revised and re-cropped into new compositions.  

Greater Than, Less Than, Equal To

When trying to send a message about your subject, camera angle counts.  You may find that, subconsciously, you prefer certain views more than others.  Why?

 

Consciously making your pinups 'greater than', 'less than' or 'equal to' will thrust the observer into a dramatic role, whether they realize it or not.  They will revere or be intimidated by that which they look up to, subjugate or treat with more care that which they look down upon, or relate to that which is on their own level.  Observe these relationships in the following photographs.

 

Babe Lab Disclaimer : Non-proprietary photos and illustrations featured on Babe Lab appear for the sole purpose of review.

The Canopy Effect

You might wonder what tree canopies and beautiful women have in common.  True, they share an organic nature, composed of many broad and subtle curves, but their simplest geometrical outlines reveal other similarities.

Look at how, in each instance, we are able to break the tree into flat, sawed-off diagonals.  Notice the very few (if any) incidents of 90 degree angles, and how the diagonals oppose each other strongly.

 

Compare that to a similar treatment of the images below.  Again, notice the deficit of 90 degree angles and the abundance of opposing diagonals.

 

Once an angular 'girl canopy' is established, it is easier to introduce subtle curves to the outline / interior while maintaining the very structural -- and very natural -- shape of the figure.  

Babe Lab Disclaimer : Non-proprietary photos and illustrations featured on Babe Lab appear for the sole purpose of review.

The Cleavage You Know





















Babe Lab Disclaimer : Non-proprietary photos and illustrations featured on Babe Lab appear for the sole purpose of review.

Imaginary Underwear

It's true that knowing the nude helps in drawing clothing, but sometimes, knowing clothing helps in drawing the nude.  Introducing : Imaginary Underwear!

Brassiers fasten beneath the shoulder blades, and wrap around the ribcage to support the bosom.
              
Panties ride on the hips, filling a gap beneath the abdomen.  When removed, we can see a 'ghost outline' of the space this garment was designed to fit.

Drawing "imaginary underwear" onto the nude helps locate important anatomical landmarks, and creates surface lines which aid in understanding the body in three dimensions.
     

Action / Repose

Think of someone driving a car with automatic transmission :  One foot works the gas/break pedal while the other stays idle. One hand grips the steering wheel while the other rests on their leg or by the window.  Many activities are like this -- with some parts of the body in action and some in repose.

We can use this knowledge when inventing poses for our pinups.  In these photos by Bunny Yeager we can see these action/repose states in evidence.


A) The model's upper body is in action while her lower body is in repose.
B) The model's left leg is in repose while her right leg is extended, tensed -- in action.
C) Here we see the model's right side in action, with a comparatively reposed left side.

When every part is active, the body will appear to be in spasm.  When every part is in repose, the body will appear limp and dead.  By balancing active parts with reposed ones, we wind up with a more natural look.

Babe Lab Disclaimer : Non-proprietary photos and illustrations featured on Babe Lab appear for the sole purpose of review.